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REVIEW: ‘Wayward #16′ is NOT a lost in translation

 
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Overview
 

Story by: Jim Zub
 
Art by: Steven Cummings
 
Publisher:
 
FG RATING
 
 
 
 
 
4.5/ 5


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1 total rating

 


To sum it all up..

Internationalist scholar and Irish intellectual Benedict Andersen mentions of the connectivity of every culture around the world, despite its outer differential facades. The creative minds behind the phenom indie series WAYWARD proves the late Irish’s keen observation because despite the sense of “East Meets West” dichotomy, writer Jim Zub and artist Steven Cummings solidify their […]

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Posted September 29, 2016 by

 
FULL REVIEW
 
 

wayward-16-covInternationalist scholar and Irish intellectual Benedict Andersen mentions of the connectivity of every culture around the world, despite its outer differential facades. The creative minds behind the phenom indie series WAYWARD proves the late Irish’s keen observation because despite the sense of “East Meets West” dichotomy, writer Jim Zub and artist Steven Cummings solidify their premise that both Irish and Japanese cultures have connectivity one way or another, particularly in the supernatural realm. Indeed, this sixteenth issue not only starts off another potentially exciting story arc, it presents readers the darker world of Irish supernatural.

The story kicks off with a historical moment of the main protagonist’s parents. It feels like a true cultural convergence of two strikingly contrast belongings. The English language is the thread that connected this star-crossed lovers, although it is highly understandable that the some of the Irish nuances would present quite a challenge for many English readers who are not well-versed with the tongue of James Joyce, W.B Yeats, Oscar Wilde, and Garth Ennis.
The story shifts to the present times that highlights Rori’s father’s landscape. Cummings’s art should be commended for making this rural town truly authentically Irish.   Furthermore, this chapter gives new readers a good summary of what transpired in the last three volumes, thus fulfilling the promise of making this issue a highly accessible starting point for newbies around, unless they want to go search for past Wayward trade paperback volumes (or the excellent gigantic hardcover edition) for more Wayward awesomeness. Also, Wayward #16 has a couple of features, including an introductory essay about Irish folklore and the supernatural, a quick Japanese sojourn note by the Wayward creative team, and a couple of good Wayward fan art. This issue is definitely worth your hard earned monies, mates.
Aside from some Irish terminologies that are definitely unfamiliar with, I am totally stumped on Rori’s father’s conversation with the supernatural whose tongue is definitely ancient. Seriously, the only word I comprehend is “excuses”. No more (unless I utilize google translate for this one). Other than that, Wayward #16 introduces both veteran and new readers the world Irish mythology and mysticism, alongside with some historical glimpses of Rori’s parents. Also, this one proves that there are more commonalities among cultures around the globe, rather than focusing entirely on differences. That’s the beauty of yin and yang, the co-existence of sameness and differentials.
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Paul Ramos

 


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