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COMIC BOOK REVIEW: Justice League: The Darkseid War: Batman #1

 
Justice League Darseid War Batman 1 cover
Justice League Darseid War Batman 1 cover
Justice League Darseid War Batman 1 cover

 
Overview
 

Story by: Peter Tomasi
 
Art by: Fernando Pasarin & Matt Ryan
 
Colors by: Gabe Eltaeb
 
Publisher:
 
FG RATING
 
 
 
 
 
4.5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 


To sum it all up..

ALL HAIL BAT-GOD! In the aftermath occurred in the pages of Justice League #45, Peter Tomasi explores something interesting on what happens if the Dark Knight possesses god-like powers, more specifically a nigh-omniscience level in Justice League: The Darkseid War: Batman #1 (with Fernando Pasarin as artist). This issue is a stand-alone that dwells on the […]

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Posted November 1, 2015 by

 
FULL REVIEW
 
 

Justice League Darseid War Batman 1 cover

ALL HAIL BAT-GOD!

In the aftermath occurred in the pages of Justice League #45, Peter Tomasi explores something interesting on what happens if the Dark Knight possesses god-like powers, more specifically a nigh-omniscience level in Justice League: The Darkseid War: Batman #1 (with Fernando Pasarin as artist).

This issue is a stand-alone that dwells on the Caped Crusader’s application of his newly found powers in his realm, Gotham City. Tomasi heads on tackle this one with laser-point precision on the objectives of this story, namely, fighting crime, his unresolved childhood confrontation, and ultimately, completing his mission in that sense makes this tie-in issue an essential Darkseid War read after all. The writer is reliable in crafting narratives dwelling on human emotional turmoil and characterizations, and in this case, he virtually nails the overall characteristics and general well-being of the newly ascended “God of Knowledge”, the Batman. The interactions of the Dark Knight with Jimmy Gordon, his parents’ murderer, petty criminals, some Amazons, and Alfred Pennyworth manifest how Bruce Wayne’s viewpoint and attitude change dramatically, causing serious worries among his closest allies, especially the commissioner, to which Tomasi knows so well that one can reference the words of wisdom of British historian Lord Acton, “power corrupts, and Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.” The writer’s scripts are accessibly sharp, even so, almost perfect for any casual and mainstream comic readers around. And, he really gives the Dark Knight another personality dimension that can be taken seriously since a certain story arc in the pre-Flashpoint/New 52’s Superman/Batman, where Bruce magically obtained Clark’s Kryptonian powers.

What are more remarkable with this issue are Fernando Pasarin’s hyper-detailed illustrations in the interiors that may probably perceive as drawn by the likes of either David Finch and/or Jason Fabok. Pasarin’s Batman portrayals here are similar to a highly toned muscular body builder, nothing more or less, which is a good thing because this physiological take is more natural and connectable to some aspiring readers and without resorting to exaggerating proportions some illustrators love to view on the Dark Knight. His drawings of Gotham City are clean, meticulous, painstakingly detailed, and even breathtaking to view. The paneling is highly accessible to follow, even when the New God travels around parts of the world to perform his newfound perspective of justice. Even his facial portrayals on the characters, both close ups and far angular ones, are remarkably intricate, well-drawn and almost real-life. Matt Ryan inks Pasarin’s illustrations with utmost care, especially the Gotham City’s skyline and the surroundings. Neither messy nor smudgy is his ink job. And Gabe Eltaeb’s colors are almost similar to Scott William’s trademark coloring style, which is a great style for the overall ambiance of the brooding city and to its distinguished protector’s personality as well. Even in the various locales, his colors are felt so positively warm, though he knows how to shift the tone to darker ones whenever necessary.

Of course, my only complaints are the following. One is Batman rather sits all the time than doing his awesome martial arts stuffs that we are all so familiar with. In short, he is becoming a rather boring fellow to watch if not for the great storytelling execution of Tomasi and the incredible artworks led by Pasarin. And second, the concepts of “pre-emptive strike” and “omniscience” are nothing novel altogether. Actually, I feel like watching Minority Report with Tom Cruise in the bat suit (pun intended). Remarkably this is a temporary moment in Batman mythos. But other than these imagined flaws, this tie-in is overall an excellent chapter for the company’s current The Darkseid War maxi-event.


Paul Ramos

 


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