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REVIEW: Christmas comes closer on ‘Klaus #7′

 
Klaus 07 cov
Klaus 07 cov
Klaus 07 cov

 
Overview
 

Story by: Grant Morrison
 
Art by: Dan Mora
 
Publisher:
 
FG RATING
 
 
 
 
 
4/ 5


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To sum it all up..

KLAUS #7 closes the postmodernist theoretical take on the origins of Santa Claus (or Klaus) that basically the fusion of the Northern European supernatural and folkloric elements and the usual Grant Morrison‘s weirdness and iconoclastic take-on on everything iconic. Yet, this ending reads very accessibly fun, if not awe-inspiring, almost superhero in treatment without the capes, […]

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Posted August 18, 2016 by

 
FULL REVIEW
 
 

Klaus 07 cov

KLAUS #7 closes the postmodernist theoretical take on the origins of Santa Claus (or Klaus) that basically the fusion of the Northern European supernatural and folkloric elements and the usual Grant Morrison‘s weirdness and iconoclastic take-on on everything iconic. Yet, this ending reads very accessibly fun, if not awe-inspiring, almost superhero in treatment without the capes, flashy gadgets, and masks.

What considers religious in origin, Grant Morrison almost single-handle convinces the readers that faith and devotion to the Supreme Being are NOT the essential bases of this harbinger of smiles and gifts; but the dichotomy of the polarities that remains true up to this day, only with some dramatic dialogues by the antagonists and the incredible pacing this conclusion showcases.
Another significant factor why this one shines is Dan Mora‘s sequential paneling and the interior art as well. Little wonder why he was recently received an Eisner’s award due to his painstaking artistic interpretations of Grant’s script. In terms of innovation, his most creative illustrations here are the magical sleighs the proto-Santa Claus used that is so radical and even gorgeous to mesmerize since, personally, the 1990s Danny Ketch-Ghost Rider’s motorcycle re-imagination.
However, there are some panels that are awkwardly drawn, like the main character’s attack on the antagonist’s left arm, but that panel shows Klaus and his body gear to the right, instead the left where the arm is dismembered. Another one is the fall of the main villain from the heavens that looks more of a meteorite rather than the usual human-falling-from-the-sky imagery/actuality. In addition, the fight scenes are rather short between the major antagonists since this finale demands some great smack down treatment. And, I believe this one comes so early, instead of either September or October (perhaps, Grant learns his lessons regarding delays, particularly in earlier Christmas-themed indie work, HAPPY. Go figure.).
Regardless, Klaus #7 caps the historical cum supernatural theoretical perspective Grant Morrison wants to present on the Santa Claus origins. Fun and surprisingly accessible, perhaps this one can redefine how and why the Holidays really matters in the era of extreme relativism and, well, postmodernism. HOHOHOHO!

Paul Ramos

 


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