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COMIC BOOK REVIEW: Daredevil #18

 
Daredevil18
Daredevil18
Daredevil18

 
Overview
 

Story by: Mark Waid
 
Art by: Chris Samnee
 
Colors by: Matthew Wilson
 
Publisher:
 
FG RATING
 
 
 
 
 
5/ 5


User Rating
1 total rating

 


To sum it all up..

MARK HITS BULLSEYE! Mark Waid rarely makes mistakes in the writing department, particularly in his zone, the superhero comics. Matched only by Alan Moore’s mastery of the English language and wordsmith, and Grant Morrison’s out-of-the-box ideas, Waid shows us readers HOW to execute a great finale, more so an entire series run. This is the […]

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Posted September 6, 2015 by

 
FULL REVIEW
 
 

Daredevil18

MARK HITS BULLSEYE!

Mark Waid rarely makes mistakes in the writing department, particularly in his zone, the superhero comics. Matched only by Alan Moore’s mastery of the English language and wordsmith, and Grant Morrison’s out-of-the-box ideas, Waid shows us readers HOW to execute a great finale, more so an entire series run. This is the case of his send-off chapter of the critically acclaimed and surprised smash hit Daredevil narrative, Daredevil #18, with the usual suspects artist – Chris Samnee and colorist – Matthew Wilson.

The chapter centers literally the final take down of our beloved blind attorney and crimson crusader against his perennial anti-thesis, Wilson “The Kingpin” Fisk, as the former tries to outwit, outsmart, outmaneuver, and outclass every move the crime lord throws to save not only his already teetered reputation but also his loved ones as well. Furthermore, similar to many superhero mainstream storylines, this issue ties-in some loose ends to give way the new creative team in post-Secret Wars event (announced as Charles Soule and Ron Garney) and the conclusion of the Man Without Fear: the Autobiography of Daredevil/Matt Murdock story arc, which personally, a fitting way to wrap up an amazing superhero narrative that was then unexpected, reinvigorating, and befitting to the arguably the first PWD (person with disabilities) superhero and crime fighter ever.

In Waid’s fashion, readers witness how Matt Murdock solves the problems and most importantly, shows us why Daredevil remains relevant in the age of post-modernity and blatant political correctness via the words of assurance of Matt’s best friend, Foggy Nelson, in true rephrasing fashion of the classic Shakespearean phrase, “You Get Up Every Morning and You Fight an Unjust Universe Because You Think Can Make a Dent”. Those are truly quotable Waid-ism! He continues the consistency of balancing dialogues and sequential pacing, especially the action scenes and the interactions between the hero and the supporting casts. He utilizes that same balance of minimalism to maximum word counts, depending the flow of the story or if the situation demands. Even the mundane lines like “Then Show Me”, “Sorry”, “No Exit, Fat Man” and “I’m Not Blind” are carefully delivered to great effects to the overall characterizations of the casts involve, including the Kingpin himself. Indeed, Mark marks the Marks!

Chris Samnee’s art is undoubtedly matched with Waid’s visions, and more so in this finale as well. Clean, detailed, minimal, and intricately drawn, Chris evolves his style as he stays with the title up to this finale issue. The eyes of Kingpin, particularly in close-ups, demonstrate the artist’s dedication to the aesthetics only found in the visual literary medium. His artistic synchronization with Waid’s dialogues; and the paneling sequences are spot-on and virtually executed with the precisions of a highly-skilled medical surgeon that is a breeze in reading and appreciative experiences. Additionally, Matthew Wilson’s colors compliment so well with the main illustrator’s already incredible artworks and even enhance the mood, ambiance and suspense of this send-off furthermore. The past history paneling are presented in dull colors to distinguish these from the present time, and even so the red colors that are expertly separated Daredevil’s costume, blood and other red-colored objects. This is simply one of the best comic team synchronizations the mainstream comic industry delivers since the inaugural Daredevil issue four years ago.

My praises are incomplete without the obligatory nitpickings since the question of “objectivity” is simply out of the question altogether. As I enjoy the fight scenes of Matt and Wilson, I rather hoped and expected that same smackdown would have been a bit longer similar to the takes Frank Miller, Brian Michael Bendis and Ed Brubaker’s respective Daredevil takes. Second, I complain on the lengthiness of this finale issue for this is JUST a standard comic book, a 22-page ultimate Daredevil story. Sure, many finales are “epic” in size and scope (and understandably, pricey) but this Daredevil salutatory issue is thin (though Waid knows that, he compensates this with his high-caliber storytelling). And lastly, the kind of paper Marvel is using nowadays. So soft and brittle, my copy is simply highly fragile as well. With the hefty price tag of $3.99, this is what Marvel treats on some great titles these days. Marvel, we deserve better than this!

Daredevil #18 is the culmination of Mark Waid’s four-year revolutionary run on the character that is now enjoying some resurgence in popularity these days, like Marvel’s Daredevil TV series on Netflix. He closes his Daredevil tale nicely so that Charles Soule can have a clean slate on this handicapped (but superbly enhanced) attorney. Matt’s profile is done, as what Waid originally intended and delivered. Samnee and Wilson’s respective illustrative executions are equally exquisite and undoubtedly consistent all throughout up to the ultimate splash page that will become their artistic signature (and a love letter as well) on the guardian of the night. Thus, Waid’s Daredevil will surely elevate as one of the most essential Daredevil runs ever.


Norby Ela

 
FlipGeeks Operations Editor, Managing Editor of Comics, Komiks, Manga, atbp.


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