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GRAPHIC NOVEL REVIEW: Velvet, Vol. 2: The Secret Lives Of Dead Men TP

 
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Velvet_tp_02
Velvet_tp_02

 
Overview
 

Story by: Ed Brubaker
 
Art by: Steve Epting
 
Colors by: Elizabeth Breitweiser
 
Publisher:
 
FG RATING
 
 
 
 
 
4.5/ 5


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To sum it all up..

THE TRUTH HURTS Ed Brubaker continues his near dominance in the world of visual espionage genre that keeps his readers and critics alike on the edge of their seats due to the perplexing tale of betrayal and the search for the truth in the midst of lies, deception and other synonymous stuffs on the field […]

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Posted July 3, 2015 by

 
FULL REVIEW
 
 

Velvet_tp_02

THE TRUTH HURTS

Ed Brubaker continues his near dominance in the world of visual espionage genre that keeps his readers and critics alike on the edge of their seats due to the perplexing tale of betrayal and the search for the truth in the midst of lies, deception and other synonymous stuffs on the field of covert operations and cut throats. The writer explores that complexity in Velvet, Vol. 2: The Secret Lives Of Dead Men TP (containing issues #6-11, clocking about 130 pages), to which continues the uncovering of secrets and combing through the web of deception and corruption within the spy organization which the main protagonist, Velvet Templeton, slowly but surely unearths some vital information regarding the truth behind her husband’s undoing while still evading her former spy agency from the last premier volume. A true master of the craft of suspense, noir, and detective narrative, Brubaker makes sure he already plants a couple of red herrings as the plot either thickens or twists a little bit.

Basically, new readers are totally advised to read first volume one to grasp and comprehend the situations behind Velvet’s back stories behind her current state. True enough, Templeton continues to evade her pursuers that are virtually similar to the famous James Bond movies (naturally) and other spy-themed incarnations. More remarkably, despite her relative “old” age, she still kicks some serious ass that would make or look many spy flicks like kindergarten versions. Her numerous amounts of infiltration to some of the most declassified and secured places in the world, including her former working place, show her advance training, and quick thinking abilities and powerful analytical mindset even when the moments get tough and tight. The writer’s female figure should be ripe for a television or cinematic adaptation sooner than later! Furthermore, never forgetting the true power of femininity she already possesses, she utilizes this without hesitations and qualms as long as it gets her objectives at hand. Nudity, sexuality and disturbing themes are just fair staples in her quest of knowing the truth behind her current predicament. Ed treats his female creation with great care by showcasing her sophistication, finesse and the projection of the essential aura of what a true femme fatale should (and would) be.

Steve Epting continues to amaze fans and readers with his brand of high quality of artistry he embraces since the years he collaborated with Brubaker in the glorious Captain America run in the mid-2000s. His excellent realist illustrations of the 1950s European settings and the equally European inspired proportional anatomical perspectives are some of the powerful reminders why he and Brubaker’s Velvet is one of the best Image titles in the market nowadays.

Sure, additional features are virtually excluded for Ed wants to reward single-issue (or hardcore) readers to benefit of additional features (interesting letter column and pop culture historical essays) more than their trade paperback counterparts. But still, Velvet volume two remains an important reading in the ever increasing importance and influence of anything Brubaker and the suspense genre.


Paul Ramos

 


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